Schlagwort-Archive: EU-Parliament

After the manipulation is before the manipulation

On 12 September 2018, the EU Parliament voted on the proposed Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market. The entire summer of 2018 was characterized by a gigantic lobbying assault as the directive’s opponents resorted to the means of asymmetrical lobbying and bombarded EU parliamentarians with avalanches of emails and floods of tweets in a manner resembling the handiwork of a grassroots movement.
Immediately after losing the September vote, the directive’s opponents marshaled their forces to sketch out how they could influence the trilogue process of upcoming negotiations on the legislation between the Council of the European Union (the member states), the EU Commission and the EU Parliament.

“It is coming from Google”?
On 21 September 2018, the fifth “Das ist Netzpolitik!” [“This is net politics!”] conference took place in Berlin. One of the speakers was Julia Reda, the sole representative of the Pirate Party in the EU parliament. At the conference – addressing her supporters and requesting that they write to EU parliamentarians – she said:

“They need to get a sense that this is relevant for their constituencies. Then they won’t believe it is coming from Google.”
After the manipulation is before the manipulation weiterlesen

SaveYourIncome – Lobbying carried out by Google, Netflix, Soros & Co.

The EU Copyright Directive, which has now been adopted by the EU Parliament, has been the subject of controversy, including e-mail bombardments of members of the European Parliament. The WebSchauder blog has reported and revealed who is behind the alleged citizens‘ protest.

This current campaign against the directive is similar to the dispute over the introduction of legal rules on net neutrality. Danish consultant John Strand produced an excellent study on this subject back in 2016 („The Moment of Truth – A Portrait of the Fight For Hard Net Neutrality Regulation by Save the Internet and Other Internet Activists“). Among other things, the study investigates the economic backgrounds of the participants and also describes campaigns carried out in the USA and India.

This article presents the similarities and differences between these alleged civil society campaigns.

 

The Participants
There are two groups that have diametrically opposed interests. On the one side, there are always the tech giants (Google, Amazon, Netflix, Mozilla, Microsoft, etc.) and, on the other, the telecommunications companies or the copyright owners. SaveYourIncome – Lobbying carried out by Google, Netflix, Soros & Co. weiterlesen

The anatomy of an assault on politics part 2 – organization of the hack

As mentioned in a previous article, saveyourinternet.eu’s campaign was primarily responsible for the flooding of MEPs‘ mailboxes with ready-made e-mails their Twitter accounts with automated tweets and their phones with switched phone calls including call guidelines.

 

Who is behind safeyourinternet.eu?
The campaign was organized by the organization Copyright for Creativity (C4C) and its secretariat N-Square. The C4C has 42 members (EFF, Edri, BEUC etc.) and, according to its own statements, is mainly financed by the Open Society Foundation (the foundation of George Soros) and the Computer & Communications Industry Association. Members of this American industry association include Amazon, Cloudflare, Facebook, Mozilla, Google and Uber. The anatomy of an assault on politics part 2 – organization of the hack weiterlesen

The anatomy of an assault on politics

The New Testament narrates numerous miracles attributed to Jesus Christ. One of them is the feeding of the multitude: Jesus is described as having multiplied a few loaves and fish so that five thousand people could eat and were satisfied.
The debate over the new EU Copyright Directive towards the end of June 2018 was characterized by a similarly remarkable form of multiplication. But what was being multiplied in this case was not bread or fish, but protest – or rather the appearance of protest.

To begin at the beginning …
In September 2016, EU Commissioner Günther Oettinger put forward proposals for a Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market.
Time passed, and Oettinger moved on to a new role within the Commission, but the wheels of bureaucracy continued to churn until the European Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs (JURI) was due to vote on the proposed directive.
In the run-up to the vote, observers may have wryly recalled the dictum of German parliamentarian Peter Struck that no bill ever exits parliament in the form it enters it. The directive’s rapporteur Axel Voss (CDU/EPP) had the pleasure of steering a process in which numerous changes and additions to the text were negotiated before it was formally adopted by the JURI Committee and Voss was finally given a mandate to proceed to negotiations with the EU member states.

Julia Reda’s simple slogans
The only member of Germany’s Pirate Party with a seat in the European Parliament, Julia Reda, opposed the proposed legislation from a very early stage. The anatomy of an assault on politics weiterlesen